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Orderly start to Wimbledon each day
An orderly start at Wimbledon each day thanks to security, stewards and chain link rope
Associated Press
2014-06-25 08:22 PM

LONDON (AP) -- It's as much a tradition as strawberries and cream at Wimbledon -- the orderly start to each day when the gates open at the All England Tennis Club and those holding grounds passes are allowed in.

While seats at Centre Court and Courts 1 and 2 are reserved, seating on all other courts -- on Wednesday, there were 14 others in use -- is on a first-come, first-served basis, increasing the possibility for a mad dash for prime seats.

But not at Wimbledon.

Just before 10:30 a.m., an announcement is made warning those already inside the gates to prepare for the approaching crowds. In reality, there's not much chance of being run over, thanks to the methodical work of three straw hat-wearing stewards and four or five security personnel who follow them.

In behind are several hundred fans who make their way in a group from the main spectator gate along a pathway parallel to Centre Court and then are released near the media center to go on their merry way. Even after the stewards drop their length of chain link rope, the crowds toddle off at a quick pace, but hardly anyone runs.

-- By Dennis Passa -- http://twitter.com/DennisPassa

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ANDY TO THE RESCUE -- Questions for defending champion Andy Murray have been wide and varied so far at Wimbledon, and several haven't involved his tennis. First there were ones about England's fortunes, or lack of them, at the World Cup in Brazil, where the team didn't win a game and failed to advance to the second round.

Another set involved his rescue of a dog on a busy street last weekend near his home.

After his first-round win on Monday, Murray played down the incident, saying "it was a two-minute drive from my house just as I was coming into practice yesterday."

On Wednesday, Murray's mother Judy elaborated, saying she feared for her son's safety when he stopped traffic to prevent the labradoodle -- a cross between a labrador retriever and a poodle -- from being hit by oncoming cars and returned it to its owner.

Judy Murray said her reaction was: "What you doing? You're on the way to Wimbledon and you're going to get run over."

She said the dog's owner was surprised to see who had saved her pet.

?"Andy was sitting in the car and she just went "Oh my god!"

-- By Dennis Passa -- http://twitter.com/DennisPassa

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Wimbledon Watch follows tennis' grass-court Grand Slam tournament in London as seen by journalists from The Associated Press. It will be updated throughout the day.

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